Remembering to Thank Your Audience

As Thanksgiving is upon us in the United States, it's important to take this time to think about what we're thankful for in our lives. And that includes our podcasts.

Remembering to Thank Your Audience

It's easy to get caught up in the game of comparing your podcast to others, especially those with more experience than you. But I can't tell you the number of times I've been turned off by podcasts I'm listening to in which the hosts complain about their "low" numbers.

Don't be those podcasters. Remember, everyone starts with zero listeners, as one of my podcasting mentors Dave Jackson says. Moving that number up is your job as a podcaster and marketer. And the more you cherish the audience you already have, the more they'll feel compelled to become your podcast ambassadors and spread the word about you and your show.

When was the last time you thanked your audience?

At the end of my episodes, I signed off by saying "Thanks for listening." It's short, to the point, and I make a point of pausing when I get to that line in my script to really think about who that episode is for and picture them as I'm saying it.

I really do mean it when I say "Thanks for listening" because, well, I am grateful they took the time out of their day to press play to hear my episode.

You don't have to say the same thing I do in every episode, if that feels unnatural to you, but every so often, maybe put out a Tweet of thanks to your followers and listeners. Post in your Facebook group or on your Facebook page a little thank you to them. Take a selfie and post it to Instagram thanking your listeners.

Be careful about your wording

This might just be my own idiosyncrasy here, but I have a problem with using the word "fans" in relation to my listeners. Yes, there are definitely listeners who consider themselves fans, and they've told me so, but that's a title I would like them to bestow upon themselves.

Maybe it's modesty or even a bit of Impostor Syndrome, but even after two years of podcasting and having listeners reach out after episodes, many of whom reach out within hours of the episode being available, it's still hard for me to believe people are excited to hear my voice and see my show pop up.

When I do get those retweets or comments or Likes, I truly feel a sense of gratitude. I even got into the habit for a few months of overusing the blushing Emoji because that is my actual face whenever someone reaches out to comment on a Tweet or Facebook post of mine.

So when you're sitting around the table with your friends and family on Thanksgiving (or whenever you take some time to think about what you're grateful for), remember your audience. And really think of them as people and not as simply stats.

Have a safe and happy Thanksgiving!